Chain Mail Jewellery & Accessories by Angie Mack

Posts tagged “cuff bracelet

European 6-in-1 Bracelet (Wide Weave)

Not anything overly special or exciting, but European 6-in-1 is one of my favourite weaves and I rarely make it width-ways (as pictured), so thought I’d post up an example of it made that way.

I’ve found that the basic European weaves (understandably) look and behave quite differently depending on which direction it’s expanded, probably best illustated in the photo below.

Both pieces are E-6-1 and were made from 1mm thick, 7mm OD stainless steel rings, with the top strip woven width-ways and the lower strip woven length-ways. You might also be able to see that due to what I’ll just call the ‘pull’ (i.e. when worn as a bracelet etc, and stretched out), the rings in the top strip sit up a little and make the mail a bit thicker, while the other version tends to sit flat no matter what. Both are still very flexible and form-fitting, so for most jewellery projects it’s probably just a matter of personal preference (I do find length-ways much easier and faster to weave due to the techniques I use, though).

This was just made into a very simple cuff bracelet, which are generally quite popular.


European 8-in-1 Chain Mail Cuff Bracelet

This has been a fairly busy week, but busy in a good way. I decided to try out quite a few new weaves, so have a lot more examples to post soon. (Also, although I’m not sure how well I did with my Half Persian tutorial, if anyone out there has a specific request for a tutorial for anything posted here, feel free to drop me a line and I’ll do what I can).

This bracelet is European 8-in-1, and it turned out relatively well (I’m not entirely happy with the rings, they weren’t perfectly round and the ends didn’t meet properly). When compared directly to a 6-in-1 piece, the differences are noticable but drastically – in the above picture, because of the density of the weave, you can see 8-in-1 has a bit more of a braided look to it (at least from a distance).

These were 20 gauge bright aluminium rings with a metric ID of 6mm, so the AR was 7.5. That probably contributed to the instability of the rings (I’m thinking they were squashed a little when cut), so although it resulted in a really nice, flexible strip, I’d probably go for at least 18 gauge wire if I attempt this weave again.

This is one of the things I like most about these dense European weaves – no matter how closely woven the rings are, the strip is still more flexible than a slinky.

I’ve been concentrating on bracelets recently, so plan to get to work on some more necklaces & earrings over the next couple of weeks – too many ideas, not enough rings!

AM


Byzantine Sheet Cuff Bracelet (Stainless Steel)

I decided to try this version of the Byzantine weave after finishing the brass link bracelet. This weave joins the Byzantine segments together much more densely, so used a fair few more rings to result in a shorter, narrower strip.

This is essentially three rows wide – the first two came together quite nicely, but the third row turned out to be quite tricky to add (not sure if it was due to how compact the weave is, or something else I wasn’t doing quite right, but I had to re-do a couple of the steps after progressing past them, as it seemed to be the only way I could get it all to fit together niceley).

I used 6mm OD stainless steel rings that are 1mm thick, so the AR was 4. Generally, that’s slightly over what I would use for Byzantine, but when the rows are interlocked like this it condenses the centre segments and there’s a lot less room to move.

I used about 450 rings, which made a strip 1.5cm wide and 16cm long, so to do something wider or longer is going to need a relatively significant amount of rings.

Once again, I went for the classic toggle to finish it off  – there doesn’t seem to be too many clasps that are really well suited to bracelets like this, so looks like I’m going to have to investigate the possibility of making my own.

AM


‘Honeycomb’ Byzantine Cuff Bracelet

This slight variation on the standard Byzantine weave probably has an official name, but I’ve been referring to it as honeycomb due to the pattern created by the larger rings.

I spotted a wide cuff bracelet using the same technique (one large connector ring to join Byzantine strands) and decided to give it a go by sight. The bracelet I was working from had used rings not much larger than the rings in the byzantine segments, but I had a bag of mixed brass rings that needed to be used for something, so this is the end result.

I used 6mm stainless steel rings (1mm thick, so an ID of 4mm and AR of 4). I’m not too sure what the size of the brass rings are, but at a semi-educated guess I’d say they’re 18 gauge (1.2mm) with an ID that’s roughly 7mm.

After figuring out how to construct it, I suspect this can be done with connecting rings of almost any size that is either equal to or greater than the rings used for the byzantine segments, as long as the gauge isn’t too thick to pass through the ends and sides. Obviously, it may not work very well with rings that are too large, unless you wanted an even lacier look.

I’m starting to warm up to using gold-toned material, though I think my preference will always be silver. Brass looks great but seems to be highly susceptible to being marked by the pliers, so not a material you want to play around with too much.

I finished this off with a simple gold-tone toggle.

AM


Examples of European 6-in-1 Chain Mail Weave

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I really like making bracelets with this weave, either single stranded like this red anodized aluminium and stainless steel strip, or wider cuff bracelets like the one pictured below.

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Generally, the result is a very flexible, rather form-fitting mesh.

It’s also a great to use for chokers, though it’s a fairly dense weave so, depending on the material used, it can get a bit weighty. The wider cuff bracelet shown above used about 400 7mm stainless steel rings (1mm thick, so 5mm ID and AR). The mail strip is 2.8cm x 17.5cm and weighs 45 grams.

AM